Portuguese in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, by Gláucia V. Silva

Walking around in parts of New Bedford and Fall River, in the U.S. state of Massachusetts, one would be forgiven for thinking that this is a Portuguese speaking region. Except that it is: one can easily order a meal at Antonio’s in New Bedford or at Portas da Cidade in Fall River, and even negotiateContinue reading “Portuguese in Massachusetts and Rhode Island, by Gláucia V. Silva”

Was kann man auf der Straße über Sprachen lernen? LoCALL goes to school

In der Woche vom 18.-22.01.2021 stellen Lisa Marie Brinkmann und Sílvia Melo-Pfeifer Linguistic Landscapes im Rahmen von LoCALL bei der Veranstaltung “Wir wollen’s wissen” vor. Die Veranstaltung richtet sich an Schulen, die den Kontakt zur Wissenschaft suchen. In unserem Fall werden wir Linguistic Landscapes in drei verschiedenen Klassen (Philosophie, Spanisch und Deutsch) vorstellen und mitContinue reading “Was kann man auf der Straße über Sprachen lernen? LoCALL goes to school”

LoCALL: Online training week (18 – 22 January, 2021). Full program available now

18-22 January 2021| Google Classroom and Zoom Between the 18th and 22nd January 2021, the second online training week of the LoCALL project will take place. Registration is free but mandatory through this link until the 10th January 2021. Check the full program and recommendations here.

Cool guy – or Linguistic landscapes in Japan / 「冷奴」あるいは日本の言語景観, by Mayo Oyama

Japan, a country slightly larger in area than the U.K, is considerably longer: It stretches for more than 3,000km Northwest to Southeast. If you were to overlay Japan on a map of Europe, tip-to-tip it would reach from Spain to Norway. Yet the only widely-spoken common language in the country is Japanese. Almost every JapaneseContinue reading “Cool guy – or Linguistic landscapes in Japan / 「冷奴」あるいは日本の言語景観, by Mayo Oyama”

LoCALL: second Online Training Week

18-22 January 2021| Google Classroom and Zoom Between the 18th and 22nd January 2021, the second online training week of the LoCALL project will take place. This time around, the training week will be organized by the University of Aveiro’s project team and will include webinars, virtual visits to museums, games, video and postcard creation,Continue reading “LoCALL: second Online Training Week”

Digital Symposium on Linguistic Landscapes in Second Language Teaching and Learning (L2TL) Contexts

KEYNOTE SPEAKERS: Dr. David Malinowski (San Jose State University, California, United States) Dr. Yasemin Bayyurt (Boğaziçi University, Turkey) Dr. Tamás Péter Szabó  (University of Jyväskylä, Finland) Registration: here.

Linguistic Landscape of Punjab (Pakistan), by Freeha Amna

If you are well-versed in the major languages of your area you might not notice the difference between the presence of one language or another in your city’s linguistic landscape unless you notice purposefully. Pakistan has two official languages, English and Urdu. In any Pakistani city, from traffic signage to commercial shop signs, these twoContinue reading “Linguistic Landscape of Punjab (Pakistan), by Freeha Amna”

Paisagem linguística da cidade de Maputo (Moçambique), por Perpétua Gonçalves

A paisagem linguística de Maputo é particularmente interessante por várias razões. Em primeiro lugar, porque, tal como muitas cidades africanas, trata-se de um centro urbano implantado numa zona multilingue, onde converge uma grande variedade de línguas: não só o Português e várias línguas bantu – com maior destaque para o Changana e o Ronga –Continue reading “Paisagem linguística da cidade de Maputo (Moçambique), por Perpétua Gonçalves”

­­Sociolinguistic landscapes of Princeton (New Jersey), by Mariana Bono

This photograph, taken a few blocks away from Princeton University campus,  depicts a store offering multiple services: cellphones, wire transfers, tax filing. While Spanish signs are prevalent, the English words “income taxes” unmistakably situate this sociolinguistic scene in the United States. In the culture of mobility that is the hallmark of late capitalism, the migrantsContinue reading “­­Sociolinguistic landscapes of Princeton (New Jersey), by Mariana Bono”